Dating Tips for the Unemployed

I was not expecting a work of literature, but I wasn’t expecting a tedious list of un-funny jokes either. The second chapter is apparently a very long series of jokes a couple pages of them detailing “This is how pathetic my unemployment is,” then another few pages of them explaining “this is how pathetic my dating life is,” and so on. I’m all for self-deprecation, but this was tedious, like a bunch of ideas for jokes that a comedienne might write out before honing one or two or three of the best storylines. And that is as far as I got. I like Smyles’ style and use of language–she really reminds me of humorists of the ‘s. There were some really creative situations and turns of phrase, too. The problem I had was that everything sort of blended together after a while. I think I’ll try her other book. It can also make for one heck of a book.

Questions?

But I wish there were more dogs in it. But Iris Smyles somehow manages to transport me to another world entirely, where thankfully none of that matters and I can just get lost in her hilarious, absurd, and dare I say yes, I do! Both will love this book. Oh, and there’s also some 19th century arctic exploration, cannibalism, astrophysics, husband-hunting, Greek mythology, and porn.

What strange, moving fun to tag along on her adventures!

There is a disarming and at the same time charming lyricism to the way Iris Smyles, the novelist, writes about Iris Smyles, the character in Dating Tips for the s:

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ISBN 13: 9780544703384

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Iris Smyles, a New York writer, was in the final editing and proofing stage for her second book, “Dating Tips for the Unemployed,” while she was part of the inaugural class of Guild Hall.

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Smyles’ portrayal of Iris in all her weirdness offers much to recognize, fear, and embrace. Walking the line between self-obsession and thoughtful portraiture, Smyles explores an inextricable link between sex and loneliness, self-loathing and self-acceptance in contemporary New York.

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Dating Tips for the Unemployed is a charming, fun, and poignant read. What I most appreciated was its structure – you can start at the end if you like, or the beginning. Each chapter is a self-contained story, which may or may not be memoir, not that it matters. I love Alice Munroe’s way of 3/5.

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“The prodigiously inventive Smyles melds novel, autobiography, and all manner of asides as she flails at art, love, and friendship with the wry intelligence of someone just wise enough to realize they have no idea what they’re doing.

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Iris Smyles has published two books of fiction: Iris Has Free Time and the forthcoming Dating Tips for the Unemployed (June ). She was a humor columnist for Splice Today, and her stories and essays have appeared in The Atlantic, BOMB, The New York Times, McSweeney’s Internet Tendency and Best American Travel Writing , among other publications and anthologies.

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Iris is a must read, must listen to personality. We’ve all been there with one inside you and the ex’s lurking in your mind while really your just trying to enjoy being alone. As she tries, like we all do to please her supportive parents of a different era when relationships lingered to golden anniversaries or at least sliver.

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Dating Tips: The First Date- GIRLS, DON’T WATCH!


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